Monday, 26 September 2011

L'Atelier d'Artiste - upstairs

Upstairs there's a huge, triple aspect, cathedral ceilinged space for sitting and sleeping, plus a bathroom. This floor has the original ferme (triangular roof truss) plus huge sliding glass windows that have been made to measure to fit the original barn openings, which not only maintains the original 'sense' of the building but gives great views over the surrounding woodland and hillside, and allows a phenomenal amount of light into the space.



























The sitting area has a sofa, a mini TV with French plus some English, Spanish, German, Dutch and Italian channels, and a combined hi-fi/DVD player/iPod dock.



























The sleeping area has a king size (160cm by 200cm) bed and the usual storage for clothes and incidentals. All the walls have been rendered with fine hemp and lime; woodwork is reclaimed chestnut.



























The bathroom was created from the former grenier (grain store) and has a tiled 180cm by 120cm (yes, you did read that right!) walk-in shower, a glass bowl sink on an acacia slab, a wall hung WC and space to sit and relax. The room is finished in a mixture of plaster, hemp and lime render, tadelakt and reclaimed chestnut.









































2 comments:

Cathy Winsor said...

I've just been looking at the photos of your chambre d'hotes. It looks stunning. We don't have a chambre d'hotes, just an old house with beams and old wood tongue & groove ceilings, which are the upstairs floors. It is dark. I've lived with these ceilings for four years. Now I have seen your interiors I've decided to slap on some primer and paint them all in various shades of white.

Kalba Meadows said...

Thank you, Cathy! I think, like us, you'll be amazed at the difference that painting your ceiling will make. The tongue and groove in ours was thirty year old orange pine (yum!), and the beams were perfectly sound but distinctly not pretty; as a combination they seemed to suck away all the light. Painting them was a Project with a capital P (especially all the cutting in between joists and floor) but soooooooooo worth it. Go for it!